Eva Moskowitz Gains Recognition With $250,000 Broad Prize

Another success came to Success Academy Charter Schools as founder and CEO Eva Moskowitz accepted the $250,000 Broad Prize earlier this month. She was presented with the honorably prestigious grant at the National Charter Schools Conference in Washington, D.C for her unwavering efforts in raising the achievement levels of low-income children of color. Eva Moskowitz has designated the sum to go towards college readiness programs soon.

 

This is a huge feat for Eva Moskowitz and her rapidly growing system. It has been a long time coming since the leader in education reform began building the academic network. Eva Moskowitz opened the first Success Academy in Harlem in 2006. Since then, 40 sites have been constructed. Today, Success Academy Charter Schools the largest public charter school network in New York city with over 14,000 students combined. Statistically, 76 percent of these children are low-income and 93 percent are of African American or Hispanic descent. Her mission statement is to “challenge the conventional wisdom that children from low-income, minority neighborhoods cannot achieve at the highest academic levels.”

 

Eva Moskowitz and her charter schools receive much support from the community, especially the wealthy sum in the hedge fund sector, for their determination in bridging the gap for less fortunate children and children of color. They received a reported $60 million in revenue for fiscal year 2014, a considerable difference from the $42 million earned in 2013, and for good reason. As noted by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, each of the networks high school and middle schools placed in the top 10 percent of schools statewide in tests on English, math, and science in 2016. Minority and lower income students reported better than wealthier, Caucasian students statewide at the proficient and advanced levels in all three subjects.

 

“This award acknowledges that students in poor inner-city neighborhoods can achieve as well or better as those from the most affluent suburbs,” Moskowitz stated during her acceptance speech for the Broad Prize in Washington.

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